36

Three strikes

Election results

Votes Pct.
Yes 6,276,177 68.7%
No 2,863,227 31.3%

If it passes

Proposition 36 would make California's three-strikes law a little more lenient by requiring a third strike to be for a serious or violent felony.

Under current law, when someone with two or more serious or violent felony convictions is convicted of a third felony -- no matter what the seriousness -- he or she is supposed to be sentenced to 25 years to life. Under Proposition 36, if the third strike is a non-serious, nonviolent felony, the convict would instead be sentenced to double the normal term for that crime; for example, a third-striker found guilty of a crime for which the normal sentence would be two to four years would instead get four to eight years.

This doesn't apply if the person's current or previous crimes included certain drug-, sex- or gun-related offenses; such crimes would still warrant a life sentence. According to the legislative analyst, the measure would save the state up to $90 million a year in corrections costs.

[For the record, Oct. 29, 2012: An earlier version of this summary said the sentence of 25 years to life was automatic. It is not.]

— Los Angeles Times

Official summary and analysis

Editorial: The Times' take

Tracking the money

A total of 68 individual contributions have been made to three committees supporting and opposing Proposition 36, raising $2,865,632. About 96% of the money raised has been to support the proposition. The list below shows the top individual contributions supporting and opposting the measure. Follow the links for additional detail.

Support
$2,746,046
Oppose
$119,586
Support contributions by state
$1
$10K
$100K
$500K
$1M
+
State Amount %
California $1,268,521 46.2%
Out of state $1,477,525 53.8%
Opposition contributions by state
$1
$10K
$100K
$500K
$1M
+
State Amount %
California $119,586 100.0%
Out of state $0 0.0%
Single contributions by size
Support
Oppose
Largest single contributions in support
# Name Date Amount
1 George Soros Sept. 25, 2012 $500,000
2 George Soros Jan. 30, 2012 $500,000
3 David Mills Jan. 4, 2012 $253,000
4 David Mills Jan. 30, 2012 $250,000
5 N.A.A.C.P. Legal Defense & Educational Fund, Inc. March 26, 2012 $175,000
6 David Mills March 15, 2012 $100,000
7 David Mills March 7, 2012 $100,000
8 Peter Ackerman Jan. 26, 2012 $100,000
9 David Mills Jan. 19, 2012 $100,000
10 David Mills April 26, 2012 $75,000
Largest single contributions in opposition
# Name Date Amount
1 Peace Officers Research Association of California Political Issues Committee Porac Pic Aug. 3, 2012 $100,000
2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Oct. 10, 2012 $10,000
3 Friends of Debbie Poochigian For Supervisor 2012 Oct. 18, 2012 $3,636
4 Fresno Police Officers Association July 13, 2012 $2,500
5 Margaret Mims For Sheriff July 18, 2012 $1,000
6 William Dunn July 17, 2012 $1,000
7 Philip Souren Setrakian, Attorney At Law Oct. 17, 2012 $500
8 Rl Chip Putnam July 13, 2012 $250
9 Fletcher & Fogderude, Inc. Oct. 18, 2012 $200
10 Michael Keitz Oct. 17, 2012 $100

Additional coverage

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* The totals for contributions to Proposition 36 include those from one committee working to support or oppose multiple propositions. The $354,920 raised is included in the totals for each proposition. This could skew the totals reported here.

* Committees campaigning for or against a proposition can contribute money to other committees working to support or oppose any of the propositions on the November ballot. To date, this committee-to-committee giving accounts for about $20.4 million. Also, totals for propositions do not include unitemized contributions under $100.

Credits: Lorena Iniguez Elebee, Stephanie Ferrell, Robert Greene, Alexandra LeTellier, Maloy Moore, Anthony Pesce, Ben Welsh.

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